Slamannan Church

 

Slamannan (Scottish Gaelic: Sliabh Mhanainn) is a village in the south of the Falkirk council area in Central Scotland. It is 4.6 miles (7.4 km) south-west of Falkirk, 6.0 miles (9.7 km) east of Cumbernauld and 7.1 miles (11.4 km) north-east of Airdrie. It sits near the banks of the River Avon, close to the border between Falkirk and North Lanarkshire councils, Slamannan has a population of around 1,398 residents.

I pass through Slamannan often,  Don’t think many people write about this charming little town stuck between Falkirk and North Lanarkshire, it really is a small Town, not much to it, however it does have a few buildings and landscape areas that are among my favourites so far. Slamannan Parish Church built in 1810, is a building I admire daily, it’s beautiful, and positioned to give it an extra edge of greatness, sitting at the top of a hill over looking the slamannan landscape. The church is historically important obviously, not only to Slamannan but Scotland in general, it’s ancient beauty should never ever be unseen, EVER!!! Slamannan Parish is one of the original parishes in the Falkirk district and was created in the 12th century. A church has stood near to the existing site since 1176 and the large graveyard attracts visitors tracing their family trees. Slamannan parish church was built in 1810, presumably on the site of the earlier church, which was dedicated to St Laurence, St Laurence’s Well  and the High St Laurence Well, 60 yds SSE, are both noted as holy wells by Walker (1883). In 1953, St Laurence’s Well no longer existed as such, having been covered with a concrete and iron manhole and made part of a sewerage system. The High St Laurence Well had been filled up.

The parish church stands on a slight mound which appears to be wholly natural. The sewerage housing over St Laurence’s Well has collapsed, but no vestiges of a well can be seen.

For the best part of the last year it has undergone huge renovation, much to my frustration as I really wanted to capture this buildings beauty.

Thankfully the work was complete and the lighting was ideal when the temptation to stop and have nosey overwhelmed me, and I am so glad I did, here are a few of my favourite images.

© Mark Mutch O’Hare

www.mcsnappyohare.co.uk